Ttc Operator Collective Agreement

The Toronto Transit Commission successfully concluded negotiations on new collective agreements with its four unions and ratified four-year contracts with ATU Local 113, CUPE Locals 2 and 5089 and IAMAW Lodge 235. Did the employer (the Toronto Transit Board) not protect its employees from harassment on its company`s Twitter account (@TTChelps), which is contrary to the Ontario Human Rights Code and the collective agreement? Most employees of the Toronto Transit Commission are members of amalgamated Transit Union Local 113. Total membership (2016) is approximately 10,000 members (drivers, ticket collectors and maintenance workers). [1] The ATU has represented Workers at the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) since 1899; Employees of previous operators were represented by ATU`s predecessor, the Amalgamated Association of Street Railway Employees of America. The president of ATU Local 113 was Bob Kinnear,[2] who held the position from 2003 to February 3, 2017 and will now be led by Carlos Santos from January 2019. The TTC Transit Enforcement Unit employs more than 50 special constables who are the security department of the transit system. They have been sworn in by Toronto Police, York Regional Police and Peel Regional Police and patrol properties, vehicles and the subway system throughout the TTC service area. From 1997 to January 31, 2011, officers were known as special constables. Between February 1, 2011 and December 31, 2013, the Special Representatives were replaced by law enforcement officers known as transit enforcement officers and primarily responsible for enforcing ticket evasion, as well as other laws in TTC By-Law #1 and certain federal and provincial laws. The officials were granted special constable status on January 1, 2014 as part of a new agreement between the TTC and the Toronto Police Service. This is the first time since 2008 that the TTC and its unions have negotiated comparisons without arbitration arbitration. This is proof of the hard work and determination of all parties to reach agreements around the table. The TTC had attempted to remove from the agreement a language prohibiting the provision of transit services.

He also wanted permission to set up part-time staff and remove the requirement that he pay a bonus of 25 percent per hour to employees who work on Sundays. The development of standard responses that are mutually acceptable to the employer and the union could be useful to senior officials who respond to tweets received by @TTChelps and that the responses they have given are not contrary to the collective agreement or the TTC`s legal obligations. . . .