Strawman Agreement

In this example, the professor uses a straw man argument by misrepresenting his assistant`s attitude in three ways: as long as it is reasonable, if you are responding to a straw man, you should start your answer by asking your opponent to justify his use of the straw man, instead of attacking him solely for his deceptive reasoning. In essence, person B creates a straw man who is a distorted version of his opponent`s original argument, which makes it easier for them to attack their opponent`s attitude. Here is a typical example of a straw man argument: remember that it does not matter whether the general claims of the teacher who uses the straw man are true or not (that is, if everyone scored perfect for no reason, then the students will not work hard in the future). This is because the professor`s argument is a misleading misrepresentation of his opponent`s attitude, which means that it is absolutely irrelevant to the discussion. This is because when listeners are invested in the discussion and take sufficient care to pay attention to the arguments offered, the straw man technique is usually ineffective and can even backfire by reducing the persuasive force of the person using it. In addition, there are several other ways to create straw arguments of people that can be as minor as changing small details in their opponent`s original testimony or as large as the complete construction of claims that their opponent never made. An Iron Man argument is one in which you distort your own attitude to make your defense easier. Essentially, an iron man is built the same way you build a straw man (i.e. by presenting an incorrect original attitude), but this time to strengthen your own attitude instead of weakening that of your opponent. . .

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